Washington parents may consider setting up rules with their teenage children when it comes to the number of passengers they can have in their car. In fact, some experts say that teens should not have any young passengers for at least the first six months that they spend as licensed drivers.

The reason is simple. While adults can more or less drive safely while conversing with passengers, teens are less experienced in this. When those passengers are their peers, the distraction can be even greater. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says that teens are 44% more likely to crash when a single peer is riding with them.

It’s not just peers who pose a distraction. In fact, having younger siblings in the car is even more dangerous since it’s easier for them to get one another to laugh or get angry: actions that take away from driving. Parents should not think about having their teens drive the younger children around, then, even though this may create an inconvenience.

Also, parents should be cautious about letting their teen ride in a friend’s vehicle. If the trip isn’t long and the friend isn’t newly licensed, then there would be less cause for concern. Another factor to consider is if there will be night driving.

Teens and adults alike are supposed to stay attentive behind the wheel. If something leads to distraction and causes an accident that harms others, they will be held liable. One thing that victims of car crashes usually want to do is determine how much their injuries have cost them and whether or not they can be compensated for these damages. This is where many go to see a lawyer for a case evaluation.