Whiplash injuries have to some extent gotten a bad name, even to the point where advocates of so-called tort reform use whiplash as an example of how people misuse the legal system to get hefty compensation for minor injuries. Thankfully, it is true that whiplash often clears up on its own after a few weeks. However, the fact that the outlook for recovery is often good does not make whiplash a minor injury. A person suffering from whiplash may suffer stiffness and pain in the neck, a limited range of motion, tingling, chronic fatigue, headaches and the like.

The symptoms of whiplash can put a person out of work for days or weeks, and it is recommended that a person experiencing whiplash seek out medical care. Moreover, it is important to remember that, as the name implies, whiplash involves a sudden throttling of the neck, much like the sudden back and forth motion of a cracking whip.

The neck and area around the head is obviously a very vulnerable part of the human body, so it is not surprising that, sometimes, whiplash injuries either last permanently or endure for several years. In some cases, the symptoms of whiplash can even resemble those of a significant brain injury.

For instance, some people experience difficulties with vision, fatigue and dizzy spells and difficulty with concentrating or with remembering information. Emotional changes are also possible. After a car accident, a Washington resident who develops the symptoms of whiplash should seek out appropriate medical care.